How to Get Want You Want Out of Life

If you’ve been on the planet for more than a year, you’ve heard the term “Creative Visualization.” Using imagination to make your dreams and goals happen is in the creative person’s wheel house. I’ve been using creative visualization for many years. In that time, I’ve built a very successful project management career and have published five books.

Prosperity and accomplishment are wonderful. They aren’t, however, the most important goals in my life. I became sick several years ago with (at the time) was a mysterious illness. Horrible stomach issues. Constant flu like symptoms. Worst of all, I was a depressed mess with no hope. Then I was diagnosed with Celiac Sprue. Though there is no cure, it can be managed. Getting healthy and taking my life back became my main goal.

Eternal vigilance. I maintain my health and continue to thrive. How? The key to successful creative visualization is a positive attitude. Being stubborn helps too.

Be Positive. Be Happy.

Is it possible to be positive all the time (24/7)? Nope. Everyone falls off the happy path occasionally. Having a positive attitude means you have confidence in your ability to make your dreams come true.

Be Positive.

“I’m positive I can learn this new skill.”

“I’m positive I can create my art.”

“I’m positive I will find a way to accomplish my goals.”

Be Happy.

“Learning something new makes me happy, because I’m doing something to help myself grow.”

“Creating my art fulfils me as a person.”

“Working toward my goals gives me a sense of accomplishment.”

Final Thought: Attitudes are contagious. We decide to be miserable or happy. Each new day brings a choice. Make the decision to try for a positive attitude and it will happen for you. Like anything else, it takes practice.

Are You Using Your Creativity to Inspire?

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Creative Leadership isn’t just a buzz phrase. It’s a way of life. Finding innovative solutions to old problems. Defining new processes no one has even considered. You – creative person – could change the course of an organization for the better!

Yeah right. I’m not in upper management in my company or on the board of my special interest organization. They won’t listen to me.

As in any situation, there’s a right way and a wrong way to present an idea. I’ll let you in on a little secret. Not everyone can see what you see. You’d be surprised how many folks out there have let their imaginations dwindle due to lack of use. The “We’ve always done it this way” mentality is easier. It’s safer. Most people hate change. It scares the hell out of them.

Umbrella in mass of black umbrellas.

Umbrella in mass of black umbrellas. Adobe Stock

Here are some tips when presenting an idea to the skittish establishment:

  • Present your idea along with the benefits (what’s in it for them: time saved, money saved, etc.) to the company or organization
  • Show the research you’ve done to prove it is a feasible idea
  • Help them to see what you’re talking about by including Powerpoint presentations or other visual aids
  • Be patient if they aren’t immediately “wowed” by your idea. You must build trust first.
  • Stick with it! Large organizations don’t change quickly. It takes time to turn a huge ship.

Final thoughts: Coffee shop conversations are littered with “I just want to write books, play my music, do my art, etc.” I know I’ve said it too when I’m frustrated. However, we are more than our art. We have the power to inspire change and hope (desperately needed in these times). My challenge to you – Look around you in the day job or organization. Do you see any way you can help to inspire change? Is there an opportunity to encourage growth and bring a little positive light into the situation? If your answer’s “No”, then you are in the wrong job! Go find a place where you can make a difference. The world needs your gift.

7 Signs You May Have a Book Crush

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Ah, L’amour! Isn’t it grand? You have a special Valentine to curl up with on those cold February evenings. Secretly, you may have more than one. Don’t worry. I’m not judging. One book crush is never enough.

Teddy bear in reading glasses sitting on the stack of old booksNot sure you have a book crush? Here are a few tell-tale signs:

  1. You pour a glass of wine and turn on soft jazz before opening the cover.
  2. If the book is written in multiple points of view, you skip ahead to read your book crush’s chapters first.
  3. You dislike your book crush’s love interest and hope the author sends them packing in the next act.
  4. You wish the author would be a little more liberal with physical descriptions.
  5. Your bookshelf or Kindle contains every word ever written about your crush.
  6. Given enough wine, you imagine joining your crush in the storyline. Naturally, they’ll leave the hot spy in the high heels (or the hot spy in the sharp suit) for you.
  7. Should the heartless author kill off your book crush, you mourn for weeks. Well, until a replacement crush rises out of the pages of a new book series.

Anymore signs I missed? Share them in the comments section.

(Images used with licensed permission from Adobe Stock)

Are You Honoring Your Creative Self?

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In all the world, there is nobody else exactly like you. Dreamer. Beautiful Soul. Creative Person.  You have a unique voice with something special to share. The story, painting, song or other art form is anxious to burst from your creative brain and out into the world. It was given exclusively to your creative self. Honor it and your talent.

DO respect your talent by staying true to the story or piece

DON’T completely alter the piece based solely on someone else’s bias

DO listen to your creative instincts

DON’T be swayed by the whims of the fickle market

DO be kind to your Creative Self when inspiration doesn’t immediately come

DON’T take yourself too seriously. Nobody’s perfect

DO be patient. True art takes time and a large amount of effort

DON’T quit when things get hard. Your art is worth the trouble

Finished! Not Quite Yet

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Congratulations! You’ve typed “The End” on your book. Listed “Fin” on that indie film. Played the last note of your glorious symphony. You’ve earned that great sense of accomplishment. Excellent job!

Hang on! You’re not quite done yet. Things to think about before you shut down your creative projects:

  • Putting Artifacts in a Safe Place – You worked hard to gather your research. Who knows when you may need it again?
  • Tying Up Loose Ends – Have you handled all the legal (or other) requirements associated with your project such as copyright or obtaining permission to use illustrations, etc.
  • Planning a Method to Evaluate Your Project – Are you planning to monitor social media or purchases, etc. to determine the performance of your product? Do you have a strategy to improve performance?
  • Improving Your Processes – Have you gathered lessons learned to improve your next project and avoid the same mistakes? See my post “What Can You Learn from Your Last Creative Project?”

Don’t forget the most important step. Celebrate your success!

Keeping Your Momentum

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Life is beautiful when your creative project is humming along. Ideas easily fall into place. You are the engineer on your “positive energy powered” locomotive. Work is actually fun for a change. Weeks fly by as you pursue your goal. You toot the whistle of your happy train with all you’ve got.

Then the tracks take an incline. The train starts to struggle a bit. Progress to the mountain peak slows. Your train is running a little low on positive energy. Maybe you’ve come across a difficult task or problem? Or you’re not feeling well. Sometimes unpredictable circumstances can put a damper on things.

I love my epic fantasy series – The Heart of The Warrior. The series spans five books, so my journey will take years. I won’t stop writing this story until I scribe the last “The End” on the last page of the last book. Currently, I’m working on edits for Book Two. It’s slow going. Why? Editing is the hardest part of writing the novel (in my opinion). I’m antsy to move on to the next book, BUT I can’t until I make sure the WIP is polished and accurate. Editing is a slow process. My happy train has dropped from 90mph to about 10. It’s hard to keep the momentum going.

Here are a few tips I use to keep my train chugging along (even if the pace has slowed to a crawl):

  • I take it one chapter at a time. If that’s too much to handle, I split the chapters into sections and do at least one section per day. The train doesn’t move very far, but at least it’s still moving.
  • I become my most enthusiastic cheerleader. Sometimes I’ll read sections out of my published novels to remind me that I can do this, because I’ve done it before.
  • I take time to find positive encouragers to motivate me. Online, feature stories on the news, positive songs, upbeat quotes. If you look for them, you’ll find the one you need to hear.

Remember: Any positive movement forward is better than standing still. Your funk will pass. I promise. Keep the momentum going!